Region-News-Team-White-Logo

Researchers Look at Growing Corn in Caves

Share this post

purduephotocave
A new technique developed by researchers from Purdue could allow some crops to be grown in caves or mines. Professor of Horticulture Cary Mitchell says isolated and enclosed environments can stop genetically modified pollen and seed from spreading, escaping into the ecosystem and crossing with wild plants.  "We don’t want to get these so-called GMO crops out into the environment, so by doing it in a cave, or in a mine, or even a warehouse you have one layer of containment there," said Mitchell. Mitchell and other researchers installed a growth chamber with insulation and yellow and blue lamps in a former limestone mine in Marengo, Indiana, to grow the corn, and by dipping the temperature they were able to reduce the stalk height without affecting the number and weight of the seeds. Mitchell adds that the technique could be particularly useful for growing genetically modified crops processed into medicine and pharmaceuticals.  "The way medicinals are made now is a very expensive process in the laboratory using mammalian cell cultures. It’s slow and it’s very, very expensive. By allowing plants to do it, you harness the natural energy of sunlight." The study was published in the journal Industrial Crops and Products.  [Photo Purdue professor Cary Mitchell and other researchers developed a technique that could allow some crops to be grown in caves or mines. Photo courtesy of Purdue University.]


Meet-The-Team-white

Laura-WXRD Scott-WXRD Brent-WXRD
LAURA WALUSZKO
Region News Team
SCOTT ROSENBERG
Region News Team
BRENT BROWN
Region News Team
Jay-WXRD Karl-WXRD Annie-WXRD
JAY STEVENS
Region News Team
KARL BERNER
Region News Team
ANNIE FOX
Region News Team

Recent-Newscast-white

Flash is not supported on this device. If you wish to listen to this audio, you must download and play an mp3 using an mp3 player on your device. CLICK HERE